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Holidays ON TELEVISION Podcasts

The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree: A History in Branches

PODCAST The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has brought joy and sparkle to Midtown Manhattan since the early 1930s. The annual festivities may seem steady and timeless but this holiday icon actually has a surprisingly dramatic history. Millions tune in each year to watch the tree lighting in a music-filled ceremony on NBC, and tens of… Read More

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Bowery Boys Bookshelf Holidays

The 2022 Bowery Boys History Book Holiday Gift Guide

The best gifts in the world are books and history lovers, in particular, want nothing more than more books than they possibly have time to read. (My own library and its aching shelves are witness to this.) Here are some of my favorite books of 2022 (with a couple award-winners published in 2021), stories which… Read More

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Neighborhoods Podcasts The Immigrant Experience

The Changing Lower East Side: A View From Seward Park

In this special episode, we look at the history of New York City as seen through one corner of the Lower East Side. Created by the intersections of several streets, this is a place that has gone by many names — in the past and even today. At its center is Seward Park, the first… Read More

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Amusements and Thrills Podcasts

Jenny Lind at Castle Garden: New York City’s Most Famous Concert

What happens when P. T. Barnum, America’s savviest supplier of both humbug and hoax, decides that it is time to go legit? The result is one of the greatest concert tours in American history. The Gilded Gentleman hosts this special presentation from the Bowery Boys podcast, recorded in 2020. Listen to it here or subscribe… Read More

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Food History Side Streets

Side Streets: The new Bowery Boys podcast series, only on Patreon

We’ve just debuted a new podcast series — Side Streets, available only to those who support the Bowery Boys Podcast on Patreon, featuring conversation about all sorts of New York City related subjects. And the first episode is all about food! Greg and Tom — with some help from producer Kieran Gannon — reflect nostalgically… Read More

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Film History Podcasts Women's History

Marilyn Monroe in New York: Her Year of Reinvention

In late December 1954 Marilyn Monroe came to New York City wearing a disguise. Monroe — by then the biggest movie star in the world — came to the East Coast to reinvent herself and her career. The year 1955 would be a turning point in her life and it all played out on the… Read More

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The Gilded Gentleman Writers and Artists

Emily Post and 100 Years of Etiquette: The Simple Art of Getting Along

Have you listened to The Gilded Gentleman’s recent episode on the story of Emily Post. No? Where are your manners?! In July of 1922, an unassuming book with a rich blue cover landed on bookstore shelves. Titled simply Etiquette by a moderately successful writer named Emily Post, the book went on to become a cornerstone of America’s social… Read More

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Hudson Valley Mysterious Stories Podcasts

Ghost Stories of the Hudson River: Exploring Five Haunted Histories

Beware! The ghosts and goblins of the Hudson River Valley have been awakened from their dark slumber. In this year’s annual celebration of New York urban legends and folktales, we journey up the Hudson River to explore the region’s spookiest stories. Tales of mystery and the supernatural have possessed the villages and towns of the… Read More

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Podcasts Politics and Protest

National Calamity: Samuel Tilden and the Presidential Election of 1876

You may have heard about the messy, chaotic and truly horrible presidential election of 1876, pitting Democrat Samuel Tilden and Republican Rutherford B Hayes. But did you know that New York City plays a huge role in this moment in American history? Tilden, the governor of New York, was a political superstar, a reformer famous… Read More

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American History True Crime

Insanity: Congressman Daniel Sickles shot and killed the son of Francis Scott Key

On the 160th anniversary of the killing of Phillip Barton Key, I’m reposting this article from 2014 which originally ran on the 100th anniversary of Daniel Sickle’s death. We don’t have large, parade-like funeral processions marching up the avenues as they once did during the Gilded Age and in the early years of the 20th… Read More

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Events Mysterious Stories

The Bowery Boys Live: Ghost Stories of New York TICKETS NOW ON SALE

It’s never too late to start planning for the spooky season with all your seasonal favorites — new sweaters, pumpkin spice latte and Bowery Boys ghost stories podcasts. And once again this year — on October 30 and 31 — you can hear those ghost stories LIVE. Tom and Greg return to Joe’s Pub at… Read More

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Podcasts Politics and Protest Preservation

The History of Jefferson Market and the Women’s House of Detention

In the heart of Greenwich Village sits the Jefferson Market Library, a branch of the New York Public Library, and a beautiful garden which offers a relaxing respite from the busy neighborhood. But a prison once rose from this very spot — more than one in fact. While there was indeed a market at Jefferson… Read More

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Events

New Live Event: The Bowery Boys at Caveat (September 1)

Join Tom Meyers and Greg Young as they celebrate their 15th year of making the Bowery Boys Podcast with a special live podcast recording at Caveat on the Lower East Side.  Mark your calendar for Thursday, September 1, 2022 at 7pm. Greg and Tom will be joined at this show by special guest Hugh Ryan,… Read More

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Museums Science Those Were The Days

Analog City: A new exhibition celebrates New York before everything went digital

Index cards. Levers and buttons. Wheels and wires and paper. Stone-gray mechanical boxes and intricate machines of gears and pulleys. It was these things — and probably a lot of coffee — that kept New York City operating before the advent of computers. From the subway to the Wall Street trading floor, life functioned in… Read More

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Podcasts Those Were The Days

New York Calling: A History of the Telephone

Just a few months ago, most of the remaining phone booths were removed from the streets of New York City, oft neglected, a nostalgic victim of our increasing use of cellphones. For almost a century public phones have connected regular New Yorkers with the world. Who doesn’t have fond memories of using a payphone with… Read More